1972 Fiat 124

Base Coupe 1.6 L

Vehicle values by condition

Fair
Condition 4
£2,200
#4 cars are daily drivers, with flaws visible to the naked eye. The chrome might have pitting or scratches, the windshield might be chipped.
Good
Condition 3
£5,500
#3 cars could possess some, but not all of the issues of a #4 car, but they will be balanced by other factors such as a fresh paint job or a new, correct interior.
Excellent
Condition 2
£8,800
#2 cars could win a local or regional show. They can be former #1 cars that have been driven or have aged. Seasoned observers will have to look closely for flaws.
Concours
Condition 1
£12,900
#1 vehicles are the best in the world. The visual image is of the best car, unmodified, in the right colours, driving onto the lawn at the finest concours.
Insurance premium for a
1972 Fiat 124 Base Coupe 1608
valued at £5,500
£109.03 / year*

History of the 1970 - 1974 Fiat 124

A Pininfarina cabriolet replaced the Fiat 1200 Spider in 1959. It offered a cheaper alternative to the Alfa Romeo Giulietta Spider and was bumped to 1500cc in 1963. Happily, the launch of the Fiat 124 in 1966 triggered an elegant Pinifarina Spider and coupe two years later, and production of the convertible would last for almost 20 years. Even today its styling cues can be detected in its Mazda MX-5-based descendant, and 129,416 of the Pininfarina 124 Spiders were built.

Initially, the Fiat 124 Spider featured a 90hp, 1438cc twin-cam engine with servo-assisted disc brakes and a 5-speed gearbox. The engine was increased to 1608cc in 1971, 1592cc in 1973, 1756 in 1974. In 1979 the final 1995cc engine was introduced, with 102hp. Apart from growing impact bumpers in the 1970s, the Spider was remarkably unchanged through its career and the convertible top was superior to almost all of its contemporaries. An airy Boano 4-speed coupe (a 5-speed was optional) was built between 1967 and 1975, but was never as popular, with only 69,208 sold.

The twin-cam head fitted to the 124 engine powered the valvetrain by a toothed belt, considered to be a world first on a production car. The engine had an improved oiling system, modified pistons and manifold, and a Weber carburettor. The Spider’s 124 chassis utilized high spring rates, wider track and wheels, and had boxed sills, a rear cross member and strengthened wheel arches.

America was the Fiat 124 Spider's biggest market, where its principal competition was the MGB. The Spider benefited from a 5-speed, a superior top (the rear side windows folded down with it) and a vestigial rear seat. The crash bumpers were more successfully implemented than the MGB's rubber nose and tail, and the Spider maintained higher horsepower throughout the 1970s, with Bosch fuel injection finally offered on the 1980, 1995cc model. However, the Fiat dealer network was sketchy at best, and maintenance was always an issue.

Fiat pulled out of the U.S. in 1983, but Pinifarina sold the Spidereuropa from 1983 to 1985 and even marketed the car back in Europe, where it hadn’t been offered since the late 1960s. Legend Industries developed about 700 turbocharged (120hp) Spiders in the U.S. in 1981 and a Volumex version was sold in Europe with a Roots supercharger, until production finally ceased in 1985.

Fiat took over Abarth in 1971 and developed a homologated version of the 124 spider, offering 128hp, with lightweight aluminium and glassfibre panels, independent rear suspension, a roll-cage (which dispensed with the rear seat) and a fixed hard top. A 16-valve head was offered in 1975. Only 1013 examples were sold between 1972 and 1976 and survivors are extremely rare, so beware of fakes that most probably have been re-shelled.

The majority of the Fiat 124 Spiders were sold in America, which is the best place to source a survivor. The late Pininfarina Azzurra models were quite often bought as second cars by sentimental seniors, and extremely clean low-mileage examples can be found in desert retirement communities. Nevertheless, always check very carefully for rust and make sure that maintenance records are substantial.

All 1972 Fiat 124 body types

Year Make Model Submodel Body Type Engine size Average value
1970 Fiat 124 Base Coupe 1.6 L £ 2,200 5,500 8,800 12,900
1967 Fiat 124 Base Estate 1.2 L £ 2,200 3,400 4,400 5,600
1967 Fiat 124 Base Saloon 1.2 L £ 2,200 3,400 4,400 5,600
1970 Fiat 124 Base Spider 1.6 L £ 4,100 9,600 15,600 21,600
1972 Fiat 124 CSA Abarth Rally Spider 1.8 L £ 32,200 41,800 57,700 80,400
1970 Fiat 124 Special Saloon 1.4 L £ 2,400 3,900 5,700 6,700
1971 Fiat 124 Special T Saloon 1.4 L £ 2,600 4,000 5,900 6,900
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